Epoxy Installation Instructions

January 5, 2017

How to Install Epoxy.com Resin Systems


INSTALLING EPOXY RESIN SYSTEMS

Proper mixing and installation is critical to the best success of all epoxy products.  This page is to help you find the right installation information that you need to install Epoxy Resin Systems.

Surface Preparation for Epoxy Resin Installation

All quality installation start with quality surface preparationThis guide will help you to know how to properly prepare your substrate for installation of Epoxy or any other high quality resin system. Improper surface preparation could turn what seems to be a simple process into a lengthy, difficult repair.

Do and Don’t do with epoxy.

These guides will help you to not make the common mistakes that people do and the things the people don’t do that can lead to a problem or even a failure of your epoxy resin installation.

Job Supplies Required to Install Epoxy Resin Systems

This list is  a suggested list of the materials that you will need for most typical epoxy coating systems. This list is also useful for installing roller applied coating systems like Epoxy.com Chip Flooring.

Epoxy Installation Guides

Epoxy Chip Flooring System
Installation Guide

Epoxy Chip Flooring Installation Guide. Floors have a special role to play in interior design. The heavy technical demands made on floors often make the use of certain decorative products simply impossible. The use of color chips can change all that! Color chips are increasingly being used in combination with “wet” products such as Product #315 Seamless Polymeric Multi-Colored Flake Chip Floor Resurfacing System to create decorative floors with more to offer than other ornamental products…Quality! This installation guide takes you step by step through the installation of Epoxy Chip Flooring Product #315.

Product #1 High Build Epoxy Coating 21-27 mils – All Purpose Epoxy Floor Coating Installation Guide.

Product #1 All Purpose High Build Epoxy Floor Coating a two component, zero (0) VOC, 100% solids epoxy Hi-Build epoxy coating used for high foot traffic and light to moderate forklift traffic areas where abrasion resistance is required; for protection against mild corrosion and as a decorative waterproof coating for walls, floors, tanks, etc. Installation Guide For All Purpose High Build Epoxy Floor Coating #1.

1ESD / Conductive – Electrostatic Dissipative Epoxy Floor Coating Installation Guide

Conductive Epoxy Floor Coating Installation Guide –  Product #1ESD Epoxy Coating System consists of Product #899 Epoxy Primer followed with one finish coat of Product #1ESD/Conductive Epoxy Coating. Product #1ESD/Conductive is available in pigmented finish only. Product #1ESD Epoxy Coating System will test in the �ESD� range, between 1,000,000 and 1,000,000,000 ohms electrical resistance when Product #1ESD/Conductive is applied over a non-conductive primer (or non-conductive bodycoat), and produces a 12-15 mil thick ESD floor coating system. This guide will take tell you how to install the Conduct Epoxy Floor Coating.

Product  #2 High Chemical Resistance Epoxy Floor Coating Installation Guide

Chemical Resistant Epoxy Coating Product #2 is a two component, 100% solids, Zero “0” VOC epoxy chemical resistant coating used to protect chemical concrete, steel and other structural materials from non-oxidizing acids and alkalines for both interior and exterior applications.This guide will take take you through the steps to
install the Conduct Epoxy Floor Coating.

Product #15 Chemical Resistant Epoxy Quartz Flooring

Product #15 Chemical Resistant Quartz Flooring Installation – Single Broadcast Installation Method

Product #633 Novolac Highly Chemical Resistant Novolac Epoxy Floor Coating Installation Guide

Product #633 Novolac Epoxy Chemical Resistant Epoxy Coating is a 100% solids epoxy Novolac coating ideal for harsh chemical and solvent resistant applications. Product #633 Novolac Epoxy Chemical Resistant Epoxy Coating is used in secondary containment, solvent storage, pump pads, trenches, and other high exposure areas. This Installation Guide will help you install Product #633 Novolac Epoxy Chemical Resistant Epoxy Coating. You can also find more information with pictures about installation on this page the Epoxy.com Blog.

Epoxy Injection Installation

Epoxy Injection – This Guide will take you through the basics of doing epoxy injection.  Epoxy injection is one of the most economical, to make a structural repair and waterproofing in cracked concrete.

Additional Installation Guides

These are just a few or our most popular products for additional products and guides pleas contact us at:

 For more information visit our website at: www.epoxy.com , call technical support at 352-533-2167 or email us at info@epoxy.com.


Epoxy River Simulation

November 16, 2016

How to Simulate a River Bed in Epoxy


A customer asks, “I recently saw what looks like a creek bed built out of epoxy with stones in it. How is this done in epoxy?”

Here are the steps to do it:

  1. Choose your stone. The stone that you choose can be uniform in size or a blend of stone sizes and shapes.  If bigger stone is going to be used, it is recommended that you use a blend of larger stone with smaller stone.  Variations in shape will also help to increase the amount of surface area holding the system together, making it stronger. Be sure the stone is clean and completely dry before attempting any of the steps below.
  2. Make a mock-up of the complete system below in a small box made out of plywood or similar material. This will verify everything from stone selection, to aesthetics, to stone durability. It is also gives you a chance to practice your procedure,and get additional phone tech support from us if required before you proceed with your project.
  3. Construct the recessed area that your river will “flow”. That could be a recessed area in a concrete floor, a wooded shadow box or some other “box” to hold your river. Be sure the box is watertight and that the surface is properly prepared before proceeding –www.epoxy.com/surfaceprep.aspx
  4. Prime the area created in step 3 with Epoxy.com Product #12 – www.epoxy.com/12.aspx at a rate of 250-300SF per gallon.  Allow to cure until hard to the touch, typically 6-8 hours
  5. After the Primer in Step 4 is hard to the touch and before 24 hours has passed, apply a coat of Epoxy.com Product #1 – http://www.epoxy.com/1.aspx – 100% solids General Purpose Epoxy Coating to the bottom of the box created in Step 3.  This will help to give you a consistent background color. Black helps give you the illusion of infinite depth.
    1. Optionally you can add a second coat of the #1 Pigmented Epoxy Coating to increase color intensity.
    2. On the other hand if the stone in Step 6 is so deep that you will not be able to see through it you can skip this step and proceed to step 6.
    3. Allow the epoxy in Step 5 to cure hard to the touch before proceeding, typically 10-12 hours.  Do not wait more than 24 hours before moving on to Step 6.
  6. Properly mix Epoxy.com Product #17 – www.epoxy.com/17.aspx – Epoxy Stone Adhesive Part A and Part B. Add your stone into the mixed stone adhesive.  The amount of stone that you will be able to add to it will vary depending on size and how clean the stone is.  100 lbs per 3 quart batch (2 QT “A” and 1 QT “B”) is a good starting point.  This ratio should be verified in a mockup before proceeding to this step. Mix in the stone until a uniform shine can be see on all the stone. Install this mix into your “box” at the desired thickness. Be sure to pack it in tightly and level to the desired surface.  Allow to harden overnight. Do not wait more than 24 hours before moving on to Step 7.
  7. Properly mix and pour Epoxy.com Product #214 – www.epoxy.com/214.aspx – Table Top and Casting Epoxy into the spaces between the rock in step 6. You typically will want to pour a minimum of 1/8 inch or not more than 1/2 inch at a time.  Take care to break any bubbles as you go early and often.  This is typically easy to do using a hair dryer and/or Isopropyl (rubbing alcohol mist). Allow each layer to harden and cool before adding another lift.  Never wait more than 24 hours in between coats and/or pours of epoxy.

When you complete this project it will look like a stone riverbed filled with \ water.  You can also experiment with other objects in your stone mix.  Contact Epoxy.com Technical Support with your questions: info@epoxy.com or 352-533-2167


Epoxy Table Top Resin

February 2, 2016

This article is written in two parts. This section will deal with all the uses of Epoxy.com Product #214 Table Top Resin. The second article will deal with the installation of the material.

So many of you are now scratching your head, trying to figure out how I can devote an entire article to what to use our epoxy table top resin for. Well, the table top resin isn’t just for table tops. Product #214 is used for a wide variety of uses

Characteristics

Product #214 Water Clear Epoxy Casting – Tabletop Resin – Bar Top Resin is an all-purpose, low viscosity epoxy resin system for coating wood and concrete counter tops, tabletops, bar tops and similar applications. It has excellent clarity and color retention. Our clear casting resin and tabletop resin / bar top Epoxy has zero (0) VOC making it essentially odorless and can therefore be used in occupied areas. It de-bubbles and flattens a lot easier than similar materials.

Casting Resin

Our epoxy table top resin is frequently used as “casting resin”. It is poured into forms typically made out of silicone. The material is allowed to harden and then forms removed. This can be for very small parts or it can be used for very large parts.

Table Top Resin as Flooring

Product #214 Epoxy Table Top Resin can be used when a super flat floor is required. It is possible to get a floor as flat as water. This is important under certain types of machinery such as MRI machines and equipment used to product high precision parts for use in items like space satellites.

Advantages of Clear Table Top Resin #214

  • Low odor for use in occupied areas
  • Low viscosity – good wetting properties
  • Meets USDA standards for use in food handling applications
  • Glossy finish
  • Stain resistant
  • Zero (0) VOC – No VOC means it meets the toughest low VOC standards.

The epoxy table top resin that we sell has also been used for dance floors, stages, theme parks and homes to produce a floor to simulate water. Often times this is done with rocks and other objects in the epoxy to give the appearance of steam, a river, a lake, or the ocean. At the same time it allows a super flat finish that allows dancing, and all the things normally associated with a flat floor.

Multi-Aggregate Tiles and Flooring

Product #214 Clear Casting-Tabletop-Bar Top Resin is used as a clear adhesive matrix for specialty colored glass and colored aggregate flooring and tiles. Product #214 Clear Casting-Clear Tabletop Resin – Clear Bar Top Resin forms a glossy, hard surface, which is resistant to stains. It is also used extensively as a water clear casting resin.

Please send your questions to me at norm@epoxy.com or visit our website at www.epoxy.com.


Surface Preparation for Resin Systems

January 12, 2016

Surface Preparation Guide
For Concrete, Wood, and Metal Substrates


CONCRETE SUBSTRATES

I. GENERAL INFORMATION

Surface preparation is considered to be the most important step of any resinous flooring application. Improper surface preparation could turn what seems to be a simple process into a lengthy, difficult repair. The following conditions will dictate the type of surface preparation:

A. Concrete Placement
1. Slab-on-grade or on the ground

a. A 10 mil minimum vapor barrier is necessary to prevent moisture vapor transmission. An efficient puncture proof barrier is recommended.

b. Proper jointing will minimize cracking which could transmit through the resinous flooring system.

2. Elevated Slabs

a. Pan construction should be vented.

b. Metal deck construction should be properly jointed to minimize cracking.

B. Curing and Finishing Techniques
1. Curing compounds, if used, must be mechanically removed from the concrete surface prior to all resinous flooring applications.
2. Recommended techniques:

a. Wet cure

b. Light steel trowel finish to minimize laitance and provide hard
surface

C. Age of Concrete

Concrete must be a minimum of 28 days old for resinous flooring applications. Primers are now available which can be used on fresh (green) concrete on some installations. Contact the technical department for details.

D. Previous Contamination can affect the bond of the resinous flooring and must be removed. Types of contamination are:
1. Oil, grease, or food fats can usually be burned off with a flame gun or removed with a commercial degreasing compound or solvent. Epoxy.com Product #201 Oil Stop Primer is an important tool in dealing with petroleum oil contaminated concrete.
2. Curing compounds, sealers, and other laitance are best removed mechanically with:

a. vacuum shot-blasting

b. scarifying

c. sand blasting

E. Present Condition
1. Test for moisture: Coating system bond failures on slabs on grade and elevated/lightweight concrete caused by moisture vapor transmission are the industry’s largest single problem and result in extreme frustration from owners, clients, and contractors. Epoxy.com recommends testing for moisture vapor transmission. The recognized methods are:

a. ASTM-F-1869  Standard Test Method for Measuring Moisture Vapor Emission Rate of Concrete Subfloor Using Anhydrous Calcium Chloride: The maximum allowed water/vapor transmission rate is 3 pounds per 1,000 square feet per 24 hours.

b. ASTM F-2170  Standard Test Method for Determining Relative Humidity in Concrete Floor Slabs Using In Situ Probes: This test measures the  relative humidity in the slab below the surface. If taken over a period of time, it will show the rate of drying in the slab. The maximum relative humidity should be below 80%.

c. ASTM-D-4263  Plastic Sheet Test: This test gives an indication that moisture may be present.

2. Moisture related failures can be prevented through:

a. Placing new concrete over an efficient vapor barrier.

b. Testing for moisture vapor transmission as prescribed above prior to resinous flooring application.

c. Applying a moisture vapor transmission reduction system where moisture content is too high for successful resinous flooring applications. See Epoxy.com Product #830 Moisture Vapor Treatment for more details

3. A clean surface is necessary to establish a strong bond between the resinous flooring and concrete.
4. Resinous flooring systems are only as sound as the concrete they areapplied to. All unsound concrete should be repaired or replaced prior to resinous flooring applications. Consult your Epoxy.com Technical Service Department for specific information.
5. Resinous flooring materials should be applied to level concrete substrates. Grind or fill high and low spots prior to application.
6. Repair cracks prior to resinous flooring applications
F. Mechanical Prep vs. Acid Etching

Resinous flooring materials ideally bond to concrete with a rough, sand-paper finish. This finish can be achieved by either acid etching or mechanical methods. The choice of preparation is dictated by the factors above. Other factors which determine the type of preparation include:

1. Ecological restrictions involved with waste removal which could prohibit the use of acid etching and other chemical methods.
2. The type of resinous flooring material: It is recommended that concrete floors be acid etched prior to application of polyester and vinyl ester flooring systems.
G. Acid Etching

The following steps are recommended for acid etching:

1. Dilute commercial muriatic acid with water using 1 part acid by volume to 3 parts clean water by volume. Add the acid slowly taking care to avoid splashing. Workers should be protected with safety glasses, rubber gloves, and boots. If skin or eye contact occurs, rinse affected area thoroughly with clean water and follow Material Safety Data recommendations.
2. Sprinkle acid solution onto the entire surface in order to allow the acid to reach all areas of the concrete. Adequate coverage is
approximately 75 ft²/gallon of acid/water solution. Do not puddle and spread.
3. Scrub the acid solution into the concrete using a stiff bristle broom to remove loose concrete and laitancy.
4. Before rinsing, look for areas where bubbling did not occur. These areas have not been sufficiently cleaned and will require mechanical scarifying and additional acid etching.
5. When the acid solution has stopped bubbling (usually after approximately 15 minutes), rinse the floor thoroughly with water. Do not allow the floor to dry before rinsing because the salts formed by the acid reaction may cause problems with the adhesion and performance of the resinous flooring system. Test pH of the concrete surface to verify that the concrete tests alkaline.
6. Finally, the floor should be dry mopped to remove standing water and dirt remaining after the acid etching. Allow the floor to completely dry prior to the application of any resinous flooring system. Failures can occur in resinous flooring system applications due to moisture remaining
in the substrate.
H. Mechanical Preparation

Contamination and other foreign materials must be mechanically removed to ensure a satisfactory bond. All dust and debris must be thoroughly removed.

II. OLD CONCRETE

Old concrete surfaces must be structurally sound. Any unsound areas mustbe repaired prior to proceeding with the resinous installation. For
proper patching and repairing, use Epoxy.com Technical Service
Department. Remove existing paint, scale and loose concrete by rough
sanding, sandblasting, shot blasting, or grinding. In some cases where
plant conditions allow, a stripper may be used to remove excessive
build-up of paints or sealers.

Structurally sound concrete should be mechanically prepared to remove any contamination. Vacuum shot blasting is the best method for achieving
a good profile for bonding and should be used where possible. Before
installation of any Epoxy.com Product the surface must be examined for moisture vapor transmission using:

ASTM-F-1869 Standard Test Method for Measuring Moisture Vapor Emission Rate of Concrete Subfloor Using Anhydrous Calcium Chloride.

ASTM-F-2170 Standard Test Method for Determining Relative Humidity in Concrete Floor Slabs Using In Situ Probes.

ASTM-D-4263 Standard Test Method for Indicating Moisture in Concrete by the Plastic Sheet Method. This test is only an indication and should not
be used to determine moisture migration.

Other ASTM Tests which are applicable to concrete preparation are:

ASTM-D-4258 Standard Practice for Surface Cleaning Concrete for Coating

ASTM-D-4259 Standard Practice for Abrading Concrete

ASTM-D-4260 Standard Practice for Acid Etching Concrete

ASTM-D-4261 Standard Practice for Surface Cleaning Concrete Unit Masonry for Coating

ASTM-D-4262 Standard Test Method for Ph of Chemically Cleaned or Etched Concrete Surfaces

ASTM-C-811 Standard Practice for Surface Preparation of Concrete for Application of Chemical Resistant Resin Monolithic Surfacing

III. NEW CONCRETE

New concrete must be well cured and dry prior to coating. Allow to cure a minimum of 28 days unless using green concrete primer. No curing
agents or sealing compounds should be used at any time prior to coating. A light steel trowel finish is recommended when finishing the concrete surface.

Any oil, grease, laitance, or other foreign material must be removed. Steam clean with a strong degreaser such as tri-sodium phosphate. Laitance and other foreign material are best removed by mechanical
methods such as vacuum blasting, scarification, or grinding.

All new concrete can be acid etched or mechanically prepared by vacuum shotblasting, sand blasting, scarifying, or grinding. Vacuum shot-blasting provides the cleanest environmentally safe area during
cleaning. It also provides a mechanically rough surface to achieve a
good bond.

When acid etching, use a 3 to 1 dilution of water to acid and follow directions printed above.

Before the installation of any Epoxy.com resinous system, the surface should be examined for moisture. Test for moisture vapor transmission using ASTM F-1869 Standard Test Method for Measuring Moisture Vapor Emission Rate of Concrete Subfloor Using Anhydrous Calcium Chloride. The maximum allowable rate is 3 pounds per 1,000 square feet per 24 hours.

Another procedure that helps determine slab dryness is ASTM-F-2170 Standard Test Method for Determining Relative Humidity in Concrete Floor Slabs Using In Situ Probes. Maximum allowable R.H. for protimeter test is 80%.

WOOD SUBSTRATES

I. GENERAL INFORMATION

Resinous flooring must always be applied directly to exterior grade plywood with extended glue line INTERIOR GRADE PLYWOOD delaminates easily and SHOULD NOT BE USED
as it could result in a failure of the resinous flooring system. MARINE GRADE PLYWOOD contains moisture repellants which could cause a darkening of the resinous flooring system and SHOULD NOT BE USED. All plywood must be completely free of all waxes, varnishes, or other foreign materials.

A. Plywood used to cover existing wood floors
1. Clean and fasten existing wood floor to the floor joists.
2. If the floor is completely sound, fasten ½ Exterior grade plywood “C” plugged with an exterior glue line to the existing floor. Stagger the plywood for strength.
3. ¾” DFPA Exterior or ¾” DFPA Underlayment grade plywood with exterior glue line must be used if the existing floor cannot be cleaned, or is not sound.
4. All plywood must be completely free of all waxes, varnishes, or other foreign materials.
5. Secure plywood with exterior glue.
6. Use Ring Shank or Wood Screws at six (6) inch centers around panel edges and support.
7. Stagger all panel joints, fill joints with epoxy filler, and coverjoints with fiberglass cloth and epoxy resin.
8. Lightly sand the floor surface to insure proper adhesion of the resinous flooring system.
9. Seal all joints and fastener head holes with Epoxy.com Product #2005 – Semi-Flexible Epoxy Gel Adhesive.
10. Prime surface with appropriate primer prior to system application. Surface may require double priming due to porosity of plywood.
B. Plywood used for new construction (plywood is laid directly on the joist)
1.  Exterior grade plywood “C” plugged with an extended glue linemust be used.

All plywood must be completely free of all waxes, varnishes, or other
foreign materials.

2. Use Ring Shank or Wood Screws at six (6) inch centers around panel edges and support.
3. Stagger all panel joints, fill joints with Epoxy.com Epoxy.com Product #2005 For outdoor applications cover joints with fiberglass
cloth and the membrane system being used with the outdoor system.
4. Lightly sand the floor surface to insure proper adhesion of the resinous flooring system.
5. Remove all dust with a vacuum cleaner.
C. Applications with waterproofing:
1. After preparing the floor surface as prescribed above, caulk all joints with Epoxy.com Product #2005 for indoor systems. For outdoor systems use the membrane used with the Epoxy.com outdoor system.
2. Apply the waterproofing membrane as specified.

METAL SUBSTRATES

I. Preliminary Preparation
A. Metal substrates must be structurally sound prior to any resinous system being applied. For best results Sandblast to Commercial Blast (SSPC10 / NACE3) for non-immersion applications and Sandblast to near white metal -(SSPC10 / NACE2) for immersion applications.
B. Remove all foreign materials such as oil and grease with solvents or other degreasing compounds.
C. All scaling and rust must also be removed mechanically by sanding, sandblasting, or abrasion.
II. Treat the blasted/abraded surface with a phosphoric acid solution as
described below in order to prevent rust formation if the surface is
left exposed for some time prior to application of the resin system.
A. Always use a 10% solution of Phosphoric Acid.
B. Mix acid solution in either glass, plastic, or earthen containers (never use metal containers), by adding Phosphoric Acid to water. NEVER VICE-VERSA due to heating or splashing which may occur.
Workers should be protected with safety glasses, rubber gloves, and boots. If skin or eye contact occurs, rinse affected area thoroughly with clean water and follow Material Safety Data recommendations.
C. Apply phosphoric acid solution by either paint brush or rubber squeegee and allow metal surface to AIR DRY.

DO NOT FLUSH METAL SURFACE WITH WATER.

III. Protect surface from contamination until the primer is applied.
IV. Wipe metal surface with MEK solvent immediately before primer
application.

Additional Useful Information for Installing Epoxy

Do with Epoxy
Don’t do with Epoxy


Applying New Epoxy over Old Epoxy

February 13, 2015

I frequently get calls and emails from folks who want to install our epoxy over an existing epoxy floor or coating that they have. They want to know if it is okay to go over it and what they have to do to properly prepare the surface.

If the existing epoxy is a good hard solid one that is well bonded to a well prepared substrate it is possible. On the other hand if you are replacing it, what is wrong with the existing epoxy? Has the existing epoxy been badly abused by heavy sharp objects being dragged on it? Was the exiting epoxy damaged by chemicals beyond the chemical resistance of the existing epoxy? Are you just trying to upgrade the look of the existing epoxy?

You should be concerned about going over epoxy that is coming loose from the substrate. That may mean that there was poor surface preparation. It may also mean that the quality of the epoxy might not be what it should be. You need to be concerned about epoxy that is wearing out. If it is wearing out you want to know why. My company and I personally started out as installers of epoxy. I have never seen or been made aware of any of Epoxy.com coatings and/or flooring systems that have worn out have come loose from the concrete. I have seen concrete so pounded by traffic that it came loose, but our epoxy was still attached and still doing its job. That is based on over 30 years of field experience with the products.

Back to the question, “can I put epoxy over epoxy?” I always assume that the reason that the epoxy is wearing out or coming loose is that the epoxy is low quality or the installation was poorly done or both until I can prove otherwise. The way that I do that is to attempt to grind or shot blast off the existing epoxy. If after a substantial effort the epoxy cannot be removed and I cannot hear a hollow sound under the existing epoxy, I feel I have proven that the existing material is solid and well bonded.

Let’s take a moment to discuss that dreaded hollow sound above. If the flooring system or coating is very poorly bonded you will get a sound from your grinder like you are dragging a piece of paper or a piece of stone under the grinder, or rubbing stone. When you tap it with a hammer you get a hollow higher pitch noise than you get when you tap solid concrete or a solid floor over concrete.

You must be sure that the substrate is free of all types of contamination, including but not limited to oil, grease, food fats, curing compounds, sealers, laitance, dirt, wax etc. The existing epoxy left behind must be well bonded, and sanded until it has no shine. See Epoxy Surface Preparation Procedures for more information on this subject.

The beauty of trying to get it off is you are removing all the shine and getting it ready to accept another layer of epoxy. Just before I install the new layer of epoxy I solvent wipe with xylene, let it dry. Then I recommend a coat either Epoxy.com Product #899 Primer or Epoxy.com Product #12 Chemical Resistant Primer. Then install epoxy as usual. For more surface preparation and installation tips please visit or “Where to Start” page at: http://www.epoxy.com/start/default.aspx

Related Resources on Epoxy

Where to Start” page may be the best way to get you off to a quick start.

Epoxy Coatings

Epoxy Primers and Sealers

Chemical Resistant Epoxy

Epoxy Chemical Resistance Chart

www.epoxy.com

Epoxy.com Technical Support
Norm Lambert, President – Technical Support Director
352-533-2167
info@epoxy.com

 

 

 


Poured Concrete Basement Waterproofing with Epoxy

September 18, 2014

This is the second half of a 2 part of a series on basement waterproofing with epoxy. In Part 1, we discussed waterproofing block wall foundations with epoxy. In Part 2A we discuss how to identify leaks that need waterproofing in basement walls, and floors that are made out of poured concrete. In this part (2B) will deal with epoxy injection repairs of cracks in poured concrete, that cause the leaks.

Earlier we discussed how many homes and businesses experience leaky basements year after year. The worse time is in the spring and after heavy rain. We discussed prudent things that you can do to improve drainage against your foundation. Epoxy Injection is designed to waterproof and give you the concrete’s structural integrity back.

Why Epoxy Inject the Cracks?

We discussed in our last article that cracking is a sign of failure caused by stresses, inadequate design, improper curing, etc. One of the dangers of a structural crack is the effect that it has on the reinforcing bar. The reinforcing represents one of the main structural values of the concrete. Cracks left unprepared allow water to enter your basement and attack the rebar.

Epoxy injection resin has two purposes:

  1. It effectively seals the crack to prevent the damaging moisture entry. Second, it monolithically welds the structure together.
  2. The injection also stops the infiltration of water into your basement.

Epoxy Injection Port Setting

Clean the concrete on both sides of the crack being careful not to force concrete dust into the crack. Concrete dust can be detrimental to the injection processes in several ways. Vacuum the area completely with a shop vac.

You need to determine the spacing of ports to be set. The spacing is a factor of the tightness of the crack and the depth of the concrete substrate. Spacing is normally between four (4) and eight (8) inches.

Port Setting and Sealing

Align ports directly over cracks. That allows injection resin to flow into the crack. Seal surface cracks and the ports in place. Sealing the exterior of cracks is done with Epoxy Gel #2006.

Selecting the Right Epoxy Injection Resin

Epoxy injection resin should typically be low viscosity injection resin- Epoxy Injection Resin #301. It must be low viscosity resin so it will flow in the smallest hair line cracks. Resin can travel several feet from the point of injection. It may take some time before reaching the next port or penetrating through pin holes in the surface. Epoxy injection effectively fills cracks including small voids and hairline cracks

Pumping Epoxy Injection Resin

The most economical way to deliver the epoxy injection is with the 450 ml binary injection system, a manual gun, or the pneumatically driven one. This uses a binary caulking gun with static mix tubes to inject the resin, insuring continuously mixed fresh material.

Limit pressure, low pressures allow gradual resin flow into the crack for deeper penetration. Start injection at the lowest point, and continues upward on the crack area. While injecting the lowest port, resin will flow to and out of the next higher port.

When pure resin is flowing out the next port cap, plug the current injection port and move to the next port. Then injection continues in the port showing resin flow. This procedure continues until all ports are full.

CONCLUSION

Epoxy injection is very effective at repairing concrete cracks and cutting of water infiltration. The right resin and equipment is critical. Epoxy injection makes a crack watertight while restoring the original structural integrity intended for the concrete. You can get all of the material you need to do this by contacting us:

321-206-1833 Customer Service – Ordering and Order Status
Katey Fontaine, VP – Customer Service Director
sales@epoxy.com

Technical Support
352-533-2167
Norm Lambert, President
Technical Support Director
info@epoxy.com

Additional Resources

http://www.epoxy.com/injection.aspx


Basement Waterproofing with Epoxy Part 2A

September 15, 2014

Poured Concrete Foundation Waterproofing

This is number 2A of a 2 part series on basement repairs. In Part 1, we discussed waterproofing block wall foundations. In Part 2A shows how to identify leaks that need waterproofing in basement walls, and floors that are made out of poured concrete. Part 2B will deal with the actual repairs to poured concrete leaks.

In our last piece we discussed how many homes and businesses experience leaky basements year after year. The worse time is in the spring after winter accumulation of snow. There are a number of prudent things that you can do to improve drainage against your foundation like roof gutters, grading and improvement of drainage. The recommendations here do not replace that conventional wisdom. It is designed to augment and improve upon these conventional methods.

Identifying the Source of the Basement Water Leak

The nice thing about poured concrete is that it holds water back very well. The leak typically happens at a cold joint or in a crack or hole in the concrete.

Concrete Cold Joints

Fresh (plastic) concrete doesn’t bond to hardened concrete. The exception is when a special epoxy bonding agent like Epoxy.com Product #2007 – is used (this bonding agent will be discussed in a future article). When concrete has hardened or has started to harden and you pour more concrete against it (without the right bonding agent) you get what is called a cold joint. These cold joints are a common source of water leaks.

Virtually all basements are built with a giant cold joint – the cold joint between the floor and the wall. Typically there is some sort of water-stops material installed in these joints intended to stop leaking at this cold joint. These water-stops can fail. So the wall to floor joint in a concrete basement is a frequent source of water leaks.

You can also get cold joints in the middle of concrete walls and floors due to multiple pours. You can get cold joints if concrete is setting to fast and fresh concrete is poured against semi cured concrete. Sometimes saw cuts in the floor can be a source of leaks

Form Ties

Then there are the ties that go through the concrete to hold the forms together on either side during the pour. If these form ties are not installed perfectly or if the concrete is not totally vibrated around them, these ties can act as a conduit to let the water in.

 

Wall and Floor Cracks

When concrete cures it shrinks that is called “plastic shrinkage”. That plastic shrinkage can and usually does result in the concrete cracking. These cracks are one of the easiest ways for water to get into your basement. If the water makes it to the fill side of the tank (under the floor or against the wall) it will typically leak out into your basement. You should look carefully for these cracks when looking for potential leaks into your basement. If you are able to investigate into the water infiltration into your basement when it is leaking it will be easy to see. If trying to find the source of leaks when the basement is dry you have to look for water marks on either side of the cracks and beneath the areas that might be leaking.

Repairing the Basement Leaks with Epoxy

In the next installment on this topic, I will deal with how you waterproof the cracks while structurally repairing them with epoxy and similar materials.

For more information please contact me:

Norm Lambert
norm@epoxy.com
352-533-2167
www.epoxy.com

 


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