Epoxy River Simulation

November 16, 2016

How to Simulate a River Bed in Epoxy


A customer asks, “I recently saw what looks like a creek bed built out of epoxy with stones in it. How is this done in epoxy?”

Here are the steps to do it:

  1. Choose your stone. The stone that you choose can be uniform in size or a blend of stone sizes and shapes.  If bigger stone is going to be used, it is recommended that you use a blend of larger stone with smaller stone.  Variations in shape will also help to increase the amount of surface area holding the system together, making it stronger. Be sure the stone is clean and completely dry before attempting any of the steps below.
  2. Make a mock-up of the complete system below in a small box made out of plywood or similar material. This will verify everything from stone selection, to aesthetics, to stone durability. It is also gives you a chance to practice your procedure,and get additional phone tech support from us if required before you proceed with your project.
  3. Construct the recessed area that your river will “flow”. That could be a recessed area in a concrete floor, a wooded shadow box or some other “box” to hold your river. Be sure the box is watertight and that the surface is properly prepared before proceeding –www.epoxy.com/surfaceprep.aspx
  4. Prime the area created in step 3 with Epoxy.com Product #12 – www.epoxy.com/12.aspx at a rate of 250-300SF per gallon.  Allow to cure until hard to the touch, typically 6-8 hours
  5. After the Primer in Step 4 is hard to the touch and before 24 hours has passed, apply a coat of Epoxy.com Product #1 – http://www.epoxy.com/1.aspx – 100% solids General Purpose Epoxy Coating to the bottom of the box created in Step 3.  This will help to give you a consistent background color. Black helps give you the illusion of infinite depth.
    1. Optionally you can add a second coat of the #1 Pigmented Epoxy Coating to increase color intensity.
    2. On the other hand if the stone in Step 6 is so deep that you will not be able to see through it you can skip this step and proceed to step 6.
    3. Allow the epoxy in Step 5 to cure hard to the touch before proceeding, typically 10-12 hours.  Do not wait more than 24 hours before moving on to Step 6.
  6. Properly mix Epoxy.com Product #17 – www.epoxy.com/17.aspx – Epoxy Stone Adhesive Part A and Part B. Add your stone into the mixed stone adhesive.  The amount of stone that you will be able to add to it will vary depending on size and how clean the stone is.  100 lbs per 3 quart batch (2 QT “A” and 1 QT “B”) is a good starting point.  This ratio should be verified in a mockup before proceeding to this step. Mix in the stone until a uniform shine can be see on all the stone. Install this mix into your “box” at the desired thickness. Be sure to pack it in tightly and level to the desired surface.  Allow to harden overnight. Do not wait more than 24 hours before moving on to Step 7.
  7. Properly mix and pour Epoxy.com Product #214 – www.epoxy.com/214.aspx – Table Top and Casting Epoxy into the spaces between the rock in step 6. You typically will want to pour a minimum of 1/8 inch or not more than 1/2 inch at a time.  Take care to break any bubbles as you go early and often.  This is typically easy to do using a hair dryer and/or Isopropyl (rubbing alcohol mist). Allow each layer to harden and cool before adding another lift.  Never wait more than 24 hours in between coats and/or pours of epoxy.

When you complete this project it will look like a stone riverbed filled with \ water.  You can also experiment with other objects in your stone mix.  Contact Epoxy.com Technical Support with your questions: info@epoxy.com or 352-533-2167


Care of Epoxy Floors

November 1, 2016

Epoxy Flooring Systems and Coatings

Daily Maintenance of Seamless Flooring and Floor Coatings

  • Sweep the floors daily.epoxy_chip_flooring_263s
  • If abrasive particles  are present they should be removed by mopping with common household detergents and rinsed completely.  Be sure not to use the detergent at a concentration higher than that recommended by the manufacturer of the floor cleaning material.  Be sure to test any cleaner that you haven’t used before on a sample of the Seamless Flooring Material or Seamless Floor coating.  You may want to be sure to prepare these samples as you are installing the floor so they will be available to you at a later time.
  • Promptly remove grease, and other contaminants from the surface of the floor
  • Be sure to rinse off all chemical solutions that may attack the surface.

Weekly Maintenance of Seamless Flooring and Floor Coatings

Smooth Systems

All seamless flooring and floor coatings should be mopped on a regular bases with a neutral soap or detergent, and completely rinsed. Be sure not to use the detergent at a concentration higher than that recommended by the manufacturer of the floor cleaning material.

Be sure to test any cleaner that you haven’t used before on a sample of the Seamless Flooring Material or Seamless Floor coating.

Mop should be rinsed often. Synthetic mops tend to work better on textured surfaces than cotton mops. The water should be changed frequently as well. Smooth floors are easily cleaned this way. It may be necessary to give extra care to areas that are subject to heavy traffic, hard rubber wheels, and steel wheels that leave marks. In these situations you can use the methods used for textured floors for these more difficult to remove contamination.

Textured Systems

Textured systems may require the use of a stiff bristled brush or floor scrubber to reach to bottom of the anti-skid texture.  Severe problem areas can be treated as follows:

Grease Removal

Grease is typically removed by Tri-sodium phosphate (TSP) or other commonly available biodegradable cleaner. Contact Epoxy.comTechnical Support Department with your specific questions.

Removing Dairy Products

Dairy products should be removed immediately as they may cause staining on some types of seamless flooring and seamless floor coating systems.

Tire Marks Removal

Scrub the area(s) with a stiff bristled brush and using the same biodegradable floor cleaner that you are using to mop with.

Stubborn Dirt or Stain Removal

When you are trying to remove stubborn dirt or stains,allow the biodegradable cleaner to set in the area for a little while longer and do the work for you. Then completely rinse to area to remove the cleaner and the dirt.

Chemical Spills

You should always rinse strong chemicals as quickly as possible completely from the surface. Chemicals allowed to dry on the surface typically become more concentrated as they dry.  That may cause the chemical to get concentrated enough to stain or even attack the seamless floor or seamless floor coating.

Waxing and Polishing of Seamless Flooring and Seamless Floor Coatings

Epoxy.com Epoxy and Urethane Seamless Flooring and Seamless Floor Coating Systems are very shinny and so waxing or polishing are not necessary.  If a floor is very old, or has seen extremely high traffic this shine may dull.  If it does then you can wax or polish the floor with standard commercial products that are designed for that purpose. Better yet, if this happens, you may want to renew or refinish your system – see below.

Renewing and Refinishing Seamless Flooring and Seamless Floor Coating Systems

Epoxy.com Epoxy and Urethane Seamless Flooring and Seamless Floor Coating Systems are designed to withstand heavy traffic and wear.  However, if there is enough traffic and/or abuse to cause the system to loose its shine, or show visible signs of wear, you may wish to restore the floor by “re-glazing” it.  Before re-glazing a flooring system or coating system you need to do the following:

  • Remove all wax, oil, grease and other contaminants from the surface
  • Lightly sand to break the shine
  • Consult with Epoxy.com Technical Support Department for the proper material to re-glaze you floor.  Be sure to follow all directions for installing the re-glazing material.

When in doubt contact Epoxy.com Technical Support at: info@epoxy.com or call us at 352-533-2167. You can also visit our website 24 hours per day at www.epoxy.com


Chemical Resistant Epoxy Selection

October 20, 2016

Requirements for a Chemical Resistant Epoxy or Vinyl Ester


Our Epoxy and Vinyl Ester product lines has extensive uses in Chemical Containment
and Chemical Resistance projects. The kind of product and systems we recommend are
based on a number of factors.  First we need to know exactly what you are doing:

  1. Are you patching concrete that has been damaged already? If so what is the extent
    of the damage?
  2. Do you need a secondary containment coating? If so what kind of traffic (if any)
    will this area see? Many of our systems will handle very heavy traffic.
  3. Are there any cracks that need repairing? If so how many lineal feet of cracks
    are there, what is the average depth and what is the average width. Repairing the cracks
    is the first step in making your project water and chemical tight.
  4. Are you looking to grout tile? We have chemically resistant Epoxy Tile Grout that
    has excellent chemical resistance.
  5. Is there any petroleum oil saturated concrete in the area. If so we have a product
    for that too.
  6. Is there any moisture vapor that is being transmitted through the floor?  We
    have solutions for that so please bring that to our attention when you contact us.
  7. Is this in an area where Static Disruptive or Conductive materials are needed (typically
    only in an explosive environment or where delicate electronics must be protected
    from static discharge).
  8. Total square footage of area requiring Chemical
    Resistant Epoxy or Vinyl Ester.

Then we will need to know some specifics about the chemical you are trying to protect
against:

  1. What is the specific chemical (or chemicals) that you are trying to resist against?
  2. What is the specific concentration of the chemical (or chemicals)?
  3. What is the duration of the exposure, before it will be cleaned up (if ever)?
  4. Is the exposure at an elevated temperature? If so what is that temperature, and
    how long will the chemicals be at this elevated temperature

If you have this information when you contact us, we can quickly help you to decide
what chemical resistant system is best and most economical for you.

Here is some additional reading that might interest you.

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For more information contact Epoxy.com Technical Support at info@epoxy.com or by calling us at 352-533-2167.


New Conductive Epoxy Primer

September 15, 2016

Epoxy.com is proud to announce Product #659. This is a  conductive primer that makes our existing conductive epoxy topcoat products even better.  Here is summary of the material:


CONDUCTIVE EPOXY PRIMER

Epoxy.com Product #659


DESCRIPTION

Product #659 Conductive Epoxy Primer is a water-based, two component, carbon filled conductive epoxy primer designed for use with various Epoxy.com Conductive Systems.Product #659  has very low odor making it suitable for use in occupied buildings.

ADVANTAGES

  • For Use with Various Epoxy.com Conductive Systems
  • Maintains Electrical Conductivity Performance over the Wear Life of the System
  • Fast Dry Time
  • Low Odor During Application and Cure
  • VOC Compliant in all 50 US States, Meets USGBC LEED Requirements

CONSIDERATIONS

  • Substrate must be above 50°F and relative humidity below 85% for proper curing.
  • Substrate must be properly prepared following Epoxy.com recommendations and free of dirt, waxes, curing agents and other foreign materials
  • Excessive moisture in the substrate will require a moisture vapor control treatment like Product #830
  • Concrete substrate must be insulated with a non-conductive
    epoxy primer/base coat like Product #12 Chemical Resistant Epoxy Primer or Product #899 Epoxy Primer  prior to application of Product #659 Conductive Epoxy Primer. Consult with Epoxy.com Technical Department for recommendations.
  • Must be top coated with a conductive top coating like Product #1ESD, or Product #630 Conductive.

APPLICATION

SURFACE PREPARATION

Surface Preparation is the most critical portion of any successful resinous flooring system application. All substrates must be properly prepared and tested for moisture as outlined in installation procedures or as recommended by Epoxy.com.

BATCHING, MIXING & INSTALLATION

 

Product #659 Conductive Epoxy Primer:
PART A 1 quart to
PART B 3 quarts to
Clean Water 8 volume ounces (6% by volume of water)
Total 4.125 quarts

Coverage (250 square feet/gal.) 265.6 square feet per batch

Pre-mix Product #659 Conductive Epoxy Primer  part B prior to combining with part A. Mix 1 part A with 3 parts B for 2-3 minutes with a low-speed jiffy mixer, scraping sides and bottom of mix vessel. Continue mixing and add 6% by volume clean potable water and continue mixing for 1 additional minute.

Immediately spread and back roll mixed Product #659 Conductive Epoxy Primer at a rate of 250 ft2 per gallon with a short nap roller over previously applied non-conductive epoxy primer/base coat.Care should be taken to avoid puddles. Allow to cure minimum 12 hours (at 75°F) to maximum 24 hours before coating with specified topcoat.

Important: Test Product #659 Conductive Epoxy Primer with ohm meter prior to top coating to confirm acceptable level of conductivity is achieved. If test readings are higher than 25,000 ohms, contact Epoxy.com Technical Support Department for further instructions before installing specified topcoat.

Top Coat with a conductive top coating like Product #1ESD, or Product #630 Conductive.

CLEAN-UP

Clean skin with soap and water. Tools and equipment should be cleaned with warm soapy water, xylene or lacquer thinner. Consult Material Safety Data for safety and health precautions.

COMPOSITION

Waterborne Epoxy Resin and Conductive Filler. Color: Black.

COVERAGE

Product #659 Conductive Epoxy Primer applied at 250 ft2 per gallon yields 2.7 mils dry film thickness.

TECHNICAL DATA (@ 75°F, 50% RH)

Viscosity 500-1000 CPS
Mixing Ratio 1 Part A to 3 Parts B by Volume
Solids Content, by volume 45%, thinned
Volatile Organic Content (VOC) <10 g/L
Bond Strength to Concrete 300-400+ psi (100% concrete failure)
Shelf Life 6 months when properly stored

CURE/DRY TIME (@ 75°F, 50% RH)

Pot Life 20-30 minutes
Dry to Touch 6-8 hours
Recoat (Refer to testing requirements) 12-24 hours
 Light Traffic 24 hours

For more information, visit us on line at Epoxy.com, email me at norm@epoxy.com or call Epoxy.com Technical Support at 352-533-2167.

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Patching Vinyl Ester Floors With Novolac

July 28, 2016

A customer writes:

“We have a dairy processing and packaging facility that was built circa 1994.  At the time of construction we chose to install a flooring system which was vinyl ester based with fiberglass mat.  The floor has held up quite well in areas where it had a good bond.  The failures we have seen are in areas that covered either an expansion joint or control joint in the concrete.  In these areas the flooring has delaminated from the concrete.  Where possible we have made a clean cut through the flooring to an area where we had a good bond and left the concrete exposed.  Other failure areas are around floor drains.  We have made repairs with quick curing epoxies in the past but these don’t seem to bond well to the existing vinyl ester flooring. 

“Having a manufacturing facility with only one down day limits our ability to make substantive repairs.  During a search for low or no VOC  flooring systems I you folks.”

I have personally made many thousands of square feet of floor repairs that sounds exactly like the issues and conditions that you are describing.

Here is what I did to permanently resolve the issue, at least in the patched areas.

  1. Cut back the edges of the delaminated areas back to a point where the vinyl ester is well attached.
  2. Prep the concrete under the failed area and the edges of the old material – epoxy.com/surfaceprep.aspx.
  3. Prime with Epoxy.com Product #12 – epoxy.com/12.aspx
  4. Install a trowel coat of Epoxy.com Product #630 – epoxy.com/633.aspx and
    1. Epoxy Mortar Blend aggregate #82 Mortar Blend Aggregate
    2. Allow to cure hard to the touch and cool.
  5. Glaze with a neat coat of Epoxy.com Product #633 with optional Anti-skid – http://epoxy.com/non-skid-additive-polycarbonate-aggregate.aspx

Please email your additional questions to norm@epoxy.com or visit http://www.epoxy.com .


Choosing Stone for Epoxy Stone

May 5, 2016

Epoxy_Stone_OverlaysBonding stone together with Product #17 – Epoxy Stone Adhesive is attractive and functional. It allows you to have the look of natural rock. This “natural rock” will let water pass through it just like its non-epoxied counterparts. It is however a good choice when you don’t want that stone to be moved, accidentally or on purpose.

This function is so nice that I am seeing projects where larger and larger stone is being utilized for the same reasons (above) as the small stone. There are a few shortcomings that should be avoided when bonding larger stones.

You want to make sure when selecting your stone that it is not too round. Round stone reduces the square inches of surfaces touching each other that are bonded together. That reduces the strength of the material, by reducing the square inches of bonding surface. If angular stone is used (as in the picture above) you increase the surface area touching each other and increase the strength.

If you want larger stones in the mix, I suggest you use a variety of smaller stone to fill in the large gaps between the bigger stone. If you combine a mixed gradation of stone that is also angular (not round) you can get an excellent compromise of strength and large stone beauty.


Monument Repairs with Epoxy

March 9, 2016

A technician who uses a non-Epoxy.com product to repair tombstones wrote me recently looking for help with problems that he was having. He goes on to say that the epoxy that he uses never fails, but rather the stone fails. When a secondary break occurs, the stone always re-breaks about 2 mm (about ¾ inch) above or below the epoxy joint. The epoxy attached to about 2 mm of the stone and holds well.

He asked me if the epoxy shrinks so much that it will ‘ pull away ‘ from the stone it’s attached to, and in his case, it pulls about 2mm of stone with it.

No I doubt it is epoxy shrinkage causing the problem. High quality epoxy has little or no shrinkage. It would have to be a very poor quality epoxy to be shrinking enough to do that.

The reason his epoxy is not working is that it is too rigid. His existing rigid material has a “high modulus of elasticity”. A material with “high modulus of elasticity” is a material that is stiff and/or rigid. A “low modulus of elasticity” material is semi-flexible, and is not rigid or brittle.

T pieces of the stone structure (in this case a tombstone) and pieces not in touch with the ground tend to get hotter and cooler faster than the larger pieces and pieces with ground contact. This is called “differential timing of the event”. For example the top of a tombstone can be heated and cooled on 5 sides, the top and the 4 sides. The base of the tombstone which is buried in the ground has earth or stone on all of its surfaces. This earth and stone tends to keep the temperature of the base more stable by insulating it and slowing the change in temperature. This works much like the insulation in your house slows temperature changes inside your house.

When an object like a piece of stone is heated it expands (gets bigger). When an object cools it contracts (gets smaller). For example 100 feet of concrete will be 1 inch longer once it is heated 100 degrees F. That is why expansion joints are cut into concrete.

In the case of tombstones all the pieces of the same type of stone have very similar if not identical “coefficient of expansion”. Since the pieces are positioned with potentially different timing of heating and cooling there is a “differential timing of the event” (see above). The result is stress areas you are seeing in the closest weakened plane in the stone near the bond line.

Product #2005 was specifically designed for tombstone (monuments) and/or stone bonding, or repair. Epoxy.com Product #2005 is very strong yet it is has a “low modulus of elasticity” (semi-flexible). The low-modulus of elasticity helps to absorb differential movement (two sections of stone heating and cooling at different times), making it much less likely to cause a stress area in adjacent weakened planes.

Camouflage the bond line rubbing stone dust(ground off the original stone or a similar colored stone) into any exposed epoxy material while the epoxy is still “wet”. That way the dust will stick in the wet epoxy making the epoxy difficult to impossible to see.

Please send your additional question and blog ideas to norm@epoxy.com


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