Patching Floor with Epoxy

July 18, 2017

Here is an outline of the procedure for patching with Epoxy.com Product #1 and Product #10.  Cold cure is identical but you should make even smaller batches and work even faster.

  1. Mix a small amount of the #10 (mix ratio 2A: 1B).
    1. Measure accurately and mix for 3 minutes with a proper size mixer.
    2. Typically very small batches less than a quart can be mixed with a stir stick.
    3. Larger batches should use a mixing paddle in a low speed drill or similar. Typically  mixing paddles are 5 inches or more in diameter.
  2. Apply a primer coat of #10 at a rate of 250-300 SF per gallon (typically done with a roller) to the substrate the mortar is to be attached to.
    1. Typically you will allow this to harden to the touch to make troweling into it easy.
    2. You can trowel into the wet primer in the case of small patches.
  3. Mortar Patch
    1. Mix another small batch of #10, using the methods in step 1 above.
    2. Add Product #82 Mortar Blend Aggregate to the mixed resin in 3a. You can add as much as 50 to 75 lbs. of mortar blend aggregate to a gallon of mixed #10 resin. If the material appears to wet you can add more, if it is too dry add less.
    3. Quickly trowel the patch into place.  Winter Cure Epoxy can set very fast in the bucket.
  4. Sealer Coat
    1. After the patch in step 3 has hardened, you can grind off any high spots and fill more material again if needed.
    2. Then seal the top of the patch.
  1. Product #10 is thinner than the #1, making it an excellent sealer for sealing up the patch.
  2. Alternately you can go directly to a very thin coat of #1
  1. Top Coat
    1. Mix small batches of #1 using the methods used in #1 above.
    2. Mix optional Antiskid fine into the coating above at a rate of 8-16 volume ounces of Anti-skid per gallon of mixed resin.  12 ounces per gallon is typical.  This is done by mixing the resin first, adding the anti-skid and mixing for another min.
    3. Quickly apply the material with a roller at a rate of 160-200 SF per gallon per coat.  Two coats is recommended.
  2. Please read all the information below before starting your project.
  1. Do with Epoxies
  2. Don’ts with Epoxies
  3. Surface Preparation
  4. www.epoxy.com/10.aspx
  5. http://epoxy.com/1cold.htm
  6. SDS Product #10 Part A – Hardener Lo-Mod Epoxy Adhesive and Mortar Epoxy Resin
  7. SDS Product #10 Part Cold Cure B – Lo-Mod Epoxy Adhesive and Mortar Epoxy Hardener
  8. SDS Product #1A – All Purpose Coating Hardener Component MSDS.
  9. SDS Product #1B -cc – Cold Cure Epoxy Hardener for Product #1

 

BE SURE TO CALL ME WITH ANY QUESTIONS OR CONCERNS!

 


Cold Temperature Epoxy

November 18, 2016

Installing Epoxy in Coolers and Cold Temperature

Extend Epoxy Installation Season into Winter

I have spoken on this subject here before but this time of year I get a lot of calls and emails about installing epoxy in cold temperatures. Our company started out as an installation company in Vermont. Summers are very short and winters are very long in Vermont. To stay a viable company, we had to figure ways of working through the winter.

Tenting and heating areas during the winter is time consuming and expensive. The solution is found in resin products that will set in low temperatures. The most durable and cost effective options of installation at cold temperatures is Epoxy and Methyl Methacrylate.

Cold Temperature Cure Resins can also be used as a super-fast setting Resinous Mortar or Coating at normal temperatures. Our Cold Temperature Cure Resins used at normal temperature give you quick turnaround time for small jobs, or larger jobs that require a short turn-around time.

Cold Temperatures Epoxies

Cold Temperature Cure Epoxy Resins allow installation to be done at low temperatures as low as 35°F., (although it sets a lot faster at 40°F) expanding your epoxy coating and epoxy flooring installation season. Epoxy.com Cold Temperature Cure Epoxy Resins can also be used in cold storage areas like food processing areas, where the temperature cannot be raised higher than 35° F or so. Normal cured epoxy typically requires 50°F or more.

Depending on how you mix the aggregate into the products below, they can be used as a mortar for overlays, or a grout for sealing between other hardened construction materials.

Commonly Used Cold Temperature epoxies

Product #1 Cold Temperature Cure Epoxy Coating is 100% solids and specially formulated coatings for cold temperature applications. Cold Temperature Epoxy Coating #1 is able to cure at temperatures as low as 35°F. It is has Zero (0) VOCs. Since it has no VOCs, it has no solvent so it meets the strictest possible standard for a low VOC coating. It is often used in coolers and food preparation areas that require constant low temperatures. Product #1 Cold Temperature Cure Epoxy Coating is also frequently used in room temperature applications to meet super-fast cure, limited shutdown needs.

Product #10 Cold Temperature Curing Epoxy Mortar Resin – This product has a low modulus of elasticity (flexibility) and is Low Viscosity. The low viscosity allows heavy loading of the right fillers. The heavy filler loading helps not only to save money, but helps to maintain better thermal coefficient with respect to concrete and steel. The low modulus of elasticity prevents it from being brittle making it less vulnerable to thermal coefficient differences. It also gives it better impact resistance.

You can find more information on cold temperature cured epoxy at: http://www.epoxy.com/EpoxyColdCured.aspx.

Please send me your questions to me by email to norm@epoxy.com


Epoxy Sealing A Floor Drain

November 8, 2016

How to Seal Around an Existing Floor Drain with Epoxy


The Problem

A food processing facility owner writes, “I have a second floor production area that has a long stainless steel trench drain around the center of the room. We hose the area down with hot water, a crack is developing next to the drain that allows water to leak by into the room below.  The floor below my quarry tile is concrete.”

The Solution

  1. Remove tile around the drain.
  2. Remove the grout under the tile and clean back to clean solid concrete  www.epoxy.com/surfaceprep.aspx.
  3. Cut a V in the concrete next to the drain to increase the bonding surface to the drain. If you cannot cut a V chip away some of the concrete next to the drain.  In other words you are trying to cut away or break away the concrete around the drain to give more surface area for the epoxy to come in contact with. The additional thickness of epoxy (against the drain) gives you extra protection against leaks. The deeper you chip away next to the drain, the more bonding surface to seal against the drain. You need to be careful not to go all the way through the concrete. If you do you will most likely have to install a form around the drain with plywood or similar material (under the concrete)to hold up your epoxy when you go on to Step 7.
  4. Grind or otherwise abrasively clean the edges of the drain to remove the shine and roughen it up. It is not so important that you have deep scratches. It is necessary to totally remove all shine off the edge of the drain.
  5. Remove all dust, dirt and debris by vacuuming. If compressed air is used be sure it is oil free.
  6. Prime the edges of the drain with Epoxy.com Product #660 – http://epoxy.com/660.aspx  -Aluminum Filled Primer. Product #660 Universal Primer and Finish cures to a tack-free finish in 1-2 hours and can be recoated between 2 and 24 hours @ 75°F with 50% Relative humidity
  7. Mix a small batch of neat (just resin and hardener, not filler) Product #10 – www.epoxy.com/10.aspx. Use this mix to prime all areas that the patch (Step 8) will need to bond to. Apply this to all concrete surfaces as well as to the surfaces primed with  #660 Aluminum Filled Primer (Step 6).  You can either let the material in Step 7 set overnight and continue with the this step within 24 hours of priming,or you can move to the next step immediately. The purpose of this primer is to make sure there is a secure bond between the patch which will be a dry mix of epoxy and aggregate and the other surfaces that would otherwise be dry. This reinforces the bond line between the patch (in Step 8) and all surfaces it will need to bond to.
  8. Make a mortar of properly mixed Epoxy.com Product #10 and Epoxy.com Mortar Aggregate Product #82. Trowel the mix in to level the space between the drain and the remaining tile. Be sure to trowel the surface smooth. Allow to cure overnight.
  9. Do a squeegee coat of the properly mixed neat (no aggregate) Product #10 to seal the patch installed in Step 8.
  10. Allow to cure until it is hard to the touch, typically 10-12 hours at 75 degrees F.
  11. Within 24 hours apply a coat of Epoxy.com Product #2 – Chemical Resistant Epoxy Coating – www.epoxy.com/2.aspx.  Add optional but recommended Epoxy.com Anti-skid – https://www.epoxy.com/non-skid-additive-polycarbonate-aggregate.aspx  – to the #2 before applying it. Allow to cure hard to the touch.
  12. Repeat step 11.

For additional question be sure to contact Epoxy.com Technical Support at 352-533- 2167 or email us at info@epoxy.com

Be sure the Epoxy.com Lable is on your product.


Fixing Floor Damage with Epoxy

September 6, 2016

Industrial and commercial floors take heavy abuse. The older the flooring the worse shape it is in. Conventional wisdom says that such a breakdown of the floor is inevitable. There are steps you can take to protect your floor before it gets damaged. Once the damage has happened there are steps you can take to permanently repair most damaged floors.

Floor joints, are the source of many industrial flooring problems. The purpose of these joints (in original construction) is to give the concrete a controlled place for the concrete crack as it shrinks. They sometimes are called expansion joints. In theory they will expand when the concrete gets hot.Indoors, where temperature is somewhat stable, most of their function of these joints has ended after 28 days or so of concrete. Concrete does most of it shrinking in the first 28 days.

wheel across empty  joint

A wheel across an empty Joint

The downside of these joints in the concrete is that it gives a place for the concrete to start chipping away. See the highlighted (in blue) corners in the illustration to the right. When wheels pass across the top it hammers the edge in the opposite side of traffic flow. This breaks off tiny pieces of concrete (again drawn in blue as a triangle at the edges of the concrete joint). The bigger the area chipped out earlier, the bigger and faster additional chipping happens. Time goes on and “pot holes”start to form in the concrete joint in direct proportion to the number of times wheels have hit a given spot.This can become a major trip and forklift hazard.

The best way to prevent this concrete damage is to fill the joints with Epoxy.com  – Product #11-100% Solids Flexible Epoxy Joint Filler for Saw Cut Joints. The #11 is semi-flexible so it still allows some joint movement but (unlike caulking) is firm enough to support the hard wheel as it passes over the joint, virtually

wheel across a filled joint

Wheel Supported by #11 as it passes over the joint.

eliminating the pounding and chipping effect on the sides of the joint. See in this diagram how the #11 supports the wheel as it passes over the joint.

For application on flat surfaces Epoxy Joint Filler for Saw-Cut Control Joints Product #11 can be poured or pumped from an Epoxy.com Binary Pumping Systems. In areas where cosmetics are important mask both sides of the substrate before applying the material.

If the areas are bigger you can use Epoxy.com Product #12  blended with silica sand to make a mortar to fill epoxy_joint_repairthe pothole, then re-cut your joint with a concrete saw as shown in the diagram here. The Product #12 can also be mixed with silica sand and used to repair areas in the center of a slab that might have started as a random crack or because of a chemical spill or due to impact damage.

If you need the epoxy mortar to set at a lower temperature and/or faster Epoxy.com Product #10 Epoxy Mortar Resin in fast or cold cure may be the best option.

Here is an outline of getting your flooring ready and some of the types of flooring we can offer you.

I can easily calculate how much material you will need for your floor.  The patching will take a little more effort and some estimation of the geometry of the repairs from you:

  1. Joints
    1. Fill joints with Epoxy.com Product #11 – epoxy.com/11.aspx.If there is spalling at the joint see “pot hole” repair below.
  2. Pot holes
    1. Fill shallow areas with a blend of Epoxy.com Product #12 – epoxy.com/12.aspx -And Epoxy.com Product #71 – www.epoxy.com/71.aspx fumed silica
    2. Fill Deep areas with a blend of Epoxy.com Product #12 and product #82 Mortar Blend Aggregates
  3. Priming
    1. Oil Saturated areas (if any) – Epoxy.com Product #201 – epoxy.com/201.aspx
    2. Areas with moisture vapor transfer issues (if any – see epoxy.com/surfaceprep.aspx ) with Epoxy.com Product #830 – www.epoxy.com/830.aspx
    3. All areas not subject to the items above primed with
      1. Epoxy.com Product #12 – www.epoxy.com/12.aspx or
    4. Epoxy.com Product #899 – www.epoxy.com/899.aspx.
  4. Floor Coating – High Build
    1. High build all purpose epoxy floor coating:  Epoxy.com Product #1 – epoxy.com/1.aspx or
    2. High build mid range chemical resistant epoxy floor coating: Epoxy.com Product #2 – epoxy.com/2.aspx or
    3. High build highly chemically resistant epoxy floor coating: Epoxy.com Product #633 – epoxy.com/633.aspx
  5. Seamless Flooring
    1. Chip Flooring – epoxy.com/chips.aspx or
    2. Solid Colored Standard chemical resistance Flooring
    3. Product #24 Pigmented mortar – www.epoxy.com/24.aspx and silica sand
      1. Top coated with Product #1 – www.epoxy.com/2.aspx  or
    4. For high chemical resistance Epoxy.com Product #2 – epoxy.com/2.aspx
    5. Epoxy Quartz Flooring – www.epoxy.com/15.aspx.
  6. Chemical Resistant Epoxy Flooring
    1. Product #630 and silica sand – www.epoxy.com/630.aspx
    2. Product #633 and silica sand – www.epoxy.com/633.aspx 

Still not sure? Email epoxy.com Technical Support info@epoxy.com  call us at 352-533-2167. We will help you select the right product for your job. We can also help you estimate how much of it you need, and quote you on those quantities.

You can also visit us at www.epoxy.com 24 hours a day 7 days a week.

 


Patching Vinyl Ester Floors With Novolac

July 28, 2016

A customer writes:

“We have a dairy processing and packaging facility that was built circa 1994.  At the time of construction we chose to install a flooring system which was vinyl ester based with fiberglass mat.  The floor has held up quite well in areas where it had a good bond.  The failures we have seen are in areas that covered either an expansion joint or control joint in the concrete.  In these areas the flooring has delaminated from the concrete.  Where possible we have made a clean cut through the flooring to an area where we had a good bond and left the concrete exposed.  Other failure areas are around floor drains.  We have made repairs with quick curing epoxies in the past but these don’t seem to bond well to the existing vinyl ester flooring. 

“Having a manufacturing facility with only one down day limits our ability to make substantive repairs.  During a search for low or no VOC  flooring systems I you folks.”

I have personally made many thousands of square feet of floor repairs that sounds exactly like the issues and conditions that you are describing.

Here is what I did to permanently resolve the issue, at least in the patched areas.

  1. Cut back the edges of the delaminated areas back to a point where the vinyl ester is well attached.
  2. Prep the concrete under the failed area and the edges of the old material – epoxy.com/surfaceprep.aspx.
  3. Prime with Epoxy.com Product #12 – epoxy.com/12.aspx
  4. Install a trowel coat of Epoxy.com Product #630 – epoxy.com/633.aspx and
    1. Epoxy Mortar Blend aggregate #82 Mortar Blend Aggregate
    2. Allow to cure hard to the touch and cool.
  5. Glaze with a neat coat of Epoxy.com Product #633 with optional Anti-skid – http://epoxy.com/non-skid-additive-polycarbonate-aggregate.aspx

Please email your additional questions to norm@epoxy.com or visit http://www.epoxy.com .


What is Most Versatile Epoxy?

August 18, 2015

My company has many different products and systems. I often get asked, “What is the best epoxy?” I need details about the

Clear Chemical Resistant Epoxy #15 over Stained concrete

Clear Chemical Resistant Epoxy #15 over Stained concrete

job to answer that question. The best epoxy is the one that is right for the specific job. That is where our company’s motto “The Right Product for the Right Job” came from. This is the driving force of our company and our technical support department. This has been our driving force for 35 years.

Perhaps the real question is, “What is the most versatile epoxy?” That is an easier question to answer. It is Epoxy.com Product #15 – www.epoxy.com/15.aspx. When I was an epoxy installer I always had Product #15 Clear Chemical Resistant Epoxy Resin on my jobsite.

Advantages

  • Clear Chemical Resistant
  • Can be applied as thin as 5/1000 inch or less and as thick as 1/32 (without Filler) or more
  • Can be applied as an aggregate filled system at a thickness of 12 inches or more.
  • Excellent wetting properties
  • Good temperature resistance
  • Low Viscosity
  • Non-shrink
  • Slower than other clear epoxies to oxidize outdoor in direct sunlight
  • Strong and durable
  • Virtually non-yellowing indoors

Uses

  • Acid Stain Concrete Floor Sealer
  • Base Coving Material for seamless flooring (when mixed with fumed silica and silica sand)
  • Clear coating over most porous materials
  • Chemical resistant primer
  • Chemical resistant mortar when mixed with silica sand
  • Chemical resistant top coating
  • Clear epoxy sealer for concrete
  • Clear epoxy sealer for wood, and other porous materials
  • Counter top coating
  • Epoxy quartz flooring
  • Pothole repair in concrete (when mixed with silica sand)
  • Sealing of stone that has been previously epoxied together (aka epoxy-rock, stone carpet etc.)
  • Surface sealing concrete cracks and joints (when mixed with fumed silica thickener)
  • Use with fiberglass or Kevlar to make strong composite members
  • Waterproof wood joint sealer (when mixed with fumed silica thickener)
  • Wood bonding as neat material or mixed with fumed silica thickener
  • Wood Floor Coating

Product #15 – www.epoxy.com/15.aspx – is a great product to have around for any number of emergency situations. Please address your questions to Epoxy.com Technical Support at 352-533-2167 or email me at norm@epoxy.com.


Repairing Floors with Epoxy Mortar Resin

August 8, 2014
epoxy-Deck-after-2

Epoxy Patching Mortar #10 for patching. Coated with Urethane Decking System #495.

Epoxy.com Product #10 is a versatile resin for use in epoxy floor patching. Product #10 comes in standard cure, fast cure and cold cure. It can be used with 3 different aggregates: self leveling, mortar blend, and broadcast aggregate. Product #10 is available in 15 colors plus black and white making a total of 17 colors available. Custom colors are available at a small additional cost.

The Epoxy Cures

Normal Cure at 77 degrees F. has a pot-life (the usable time after mixing) of about 30-40 minutes. It hardens to the touch in about 10-12 hours. Normal Cure should never be used below 50 degrees F.

Fast Cure at 77 degrees has a pot life about 15-20 minutes. It hardens to the touch in about 5-6 hours. At 50 degrees F the Fast Cure hardens to the touch in 10-12 hours. In other words the Fast Cure at 50 degrees will cure as fast as normal cure at 77 degrees F.

Cold Cure at 77 degrees F. has a pot-life of about 8-10 minutes. It sets hard to the touch in about 2.5 to 3 hours. At 50 degrees F the cold cure will typically cure in 5-6 hours. It is able to cure at temperatures as low as 35°F.

The Aggregates

The aggregates come separately from the Product #10 resin and hardener. That allows you to be able to use a unit of resin with multiple aggregates making the system even more versatile.

Mortar Blend Aggregate Product #82 is the work horse of floor patching. You can get up to 50 lbs or more of Product #82 into a mixed gallon of #10 epoxy mortar. This is ideal for deep patching.

Self Leveling Filler Aggregate Product #78 is used for self leveling applications, typically in thicknesses of 1/16 inch plus or minus. This is ideal where a thinner flat overlay is required. A typical use would be where a floor needs to be leveled. Another typical use would be for a “scratch coat” which is where you are trying to cover large amounts of chips and divots in the floor.

Broadcast Aggregate Product #77 is broadcast into wet #10 in order to produce an anti-skid surface. It can be broadcast into a neat coat (just the resin and hardener mix without the aggregate) of #10 or into the Mortar Blend Aggregate or Self Leveling filler systems above.

In addition to being able to mix the #10 with the fillers above, you can also mix it with Product #71 Fumed Silica to make a paste for cracks and other small imperfections.

 

In summary the Epoxy Mortar Resin Product #10 is a versatile epoxy mortar system available in many colors, several cures and different fillers for different purposes. This makes Product #10 an important part of your floor repair tool chest.

 

Additional Information:

Product #10 Lo-Mod Epoxy Adhesive and Mortar Epoxy Binder is a 100% solids epoxy has a low modulus of elasticity (flexibility) and is Low Viscosity. An adhesive used as a binder for epoxy mortar systems in patching and grouting applications, as a seal coat for non-skid surfaces outside, and as a primer to insure high bond strength for coatings and patches.

System #495 Elastomeric Polyurethane Traffic Membrane System– is an Elastomeric Urethane Membrane System, that is liquid applied. System #495 Elastomeric Polyurethane Traffic Membrane System is seamless, elastomeric (flexible), and UV. Thee qualities make it an excellent choice for outside applications in direct sun and weather, where water tightness, durability, and excellent appearance is required. Its elastomeric properties will allow horizontal movements up to 1/8 inch without breaking. System #495 Elastomeric Polyurethane Traffic Membrane System has excellent abrasion and chemical resistance. The surface of System #495 Elastomeric Polyurethane Traffic Membrane System can be varied to achieve the required anti-skid and decorative look.


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