Epoxy Injection of Structures Part 3

February 24, 2017

This is the third in a series on Infrastructure Repairs Using Epoxy. Part One is  Introduction to Epoxy Injection.  Part 2 is Crack Analysis Before Epoxy Injection

If your have not read that yet you may want to go back and read it before you proceed with reading this.

Port Setting

It is extremely important that if drilling to use the right tool. to set drill type ports use a vacuum swivel drill. That is a drill with vacuum attached swivel drill chuck and hollow a drill bit.

Concrete dust can be detrimental to the injection processes in several ways. Any dust remaining in the drill hole near a crack can combine with the very low viscosity injection resin. This thickens your resin turning it into a weak paste. This paste can slow or even block the resin flow. Drilling very tight crack with a solid drill forces dust into the crack. This seals the crack from resin flow. Do not allow shortcuts in the drilling procedures!  However, for most applications the surface port is the easiest and most effective method.Epoxy Injection Surface Port

Port Spacing

Determining the spacing of ports is done by a highly experience applicator. This spacing is a factor of the tightness of the crack and the depth of the concrete substrate. Spacing is normally between four (4) and eight (8) inches.

Port Setting and Sealing

Align ports directly over cracks. That allows injection resin to flow into the crack. Seal surface cracks. Sealing the exterior of cracks is done with Epoxy Gel type Bonder.

Testing The System

Test cracks that are ill defined, or if dust or debris is in the crack. This testing may be done by injecting water into the crack area.

Water left in the cracks will not effect the injection process or the curing of the Epoxy.com Injection Resin. Heavier injection resin forces the water out the cracks. Water injection helps clean the cracked areas. More important, is that it helps avoid the unexpected. This process of flushing the cracks is commonly skipped by more experience contractors, who can tell if there will be a flow of resin, by just looking at them. However, when in doubt water testing is a must.

If the cracks contain algae, chlorinated water containing copper sulfate is injected. After pumping this mixture is left over night. The next morning the crack is flushed by pumping fresh water, into it. This flushes it out before resin injection begins.

Efflorescence builds up on the bottom of a crack in a horizontal slab. Water in the crack extracting soluble calcium hydroxide is the cause. The water evaporates at the surface leaving the lime, which later reacts with the carbon dioxide in the air to form limestone. The inside of the crack, is frequently free of limestone and making it suitable for injection.

Part 4 of this series: Injection Resin Materials Product Selection.

For more information visit our website at http://www.epoxy.com, email us at info@epoxy.com or call our technical service department at +1 (352) 533-2167.

 


Epoxy Injection of Structures Part 2

February 14, 2017

Infrastructure Repairs Using Epoxy

Epoxy Concrete Injection Epoxy Wood Injection, epoxy crack repair

Epoxy Structural Concrete and Wood Repair / Waterproofing

The following article is written with enough information about resin injection systems to help protect the Owner from the misuse or improper installation of an injection systems.   For more information contact me: Norm Lambert.

This is the second in a series on Infrastructure Repairs Using Epoxy. Part One was Introduction to Epoxy Injection.  If your have not read that yet you may want to go back and read it before you proceed with reading this.

Part 2: Crack Analysis Before Epoxy Injection

As with all repair and rehabilitation of concrete, the initial job analysis is by far the most important step. Epoxy Injection Resin will weld concrete cracks but, of course, will not repair the cause of the cracking.

Analyze each potential injection application to determine the exact cause or causes of the cracking. Correcting the cracking problem can be fairly simple, or may be difficult involving design changes.

Consult a structural engineer when design changes are necessary. Do this before starting the injection. Repairing cracks by Injection is effective after these design changes. Prevent future cracks by fixing the original cause of the cracking, when ever possible.

Parking garages are an example of cracking problem that require a structural engineering analysis.Epoxy.com Epoxy Inection Often inadequate design for expansion/contraction is the cause for parking garage structural cracking. Avoid weld injecting a crack if there are not enough expansion joints. Sometimes flexible overlays such as Epoxy.com System # 495 can be used to overcome this defect. This does not however encapsulate the rebar in a way that will totally stop the premature deterioration of the steel. Often times additional joints are needed, thus the analysis of cracking problems is critical.

Bridge decks and slab on grades can often be repaired with Epoxy.com Product #684LV crack healer and sealer and save some of the cost of doing epoxy injection.

Next in the Injection Series:

Part 3: Setting Epoxy Injection Ports

For more information visit our website at http://www.epoxy.com, email us at info@epoxy.com or call our technical service department at +1 (352) 533-2167.


Epoxy Sealing A Floor Drain

November 8, 2016

How to Seal Around an Existing Floor Drain with Epoxy


The Problem

A food processing facility owner writes, “I have a second floor production area that has a long stainless steel trench drain around the center of the room. We hose the area down with hot water, a crack is developing next to the drain that allows water to leak by into the room below.  The floor below my quarry tile is concrete.”

The Solution

  1. Remove tile around the drain.
  2. Remove the grout under the tile and clean back to clean solid concrete  www.epoxy.com/surfaceprep.aspx.
  3. Cut a V in the concrete next to the drain to increase the bonding surface to the drain. If you cannot cut a V chip away some of the concrete next to the drain.  In other words you are trying to cut away or break away the concrete around the drain to give more surface area for the epoxy to come in contact with. The additional thickness of epoxy (against the drain) gives you extra protection against leaks. The deeper you chip away next to the drain, the more bonding surface to seal against the drain. You need to be careful not to go all the way through the concrete. If you do you will most likely have to install a form around the drain with plywood or similar material (under the concrete)to hold up your epoxy when you go on to Step 7.
  4. Grind or otherwise abrasively clean the edges of the drain to remove the shine and roughen it up. It is not so important that you have deep scratches. It is necessary to totally remove all shine off the edge of the drain.
  5. Remove all dust, dirt and debris by vacuuming. If compressed air is used be sure it is oil free.
  6. Prime the edges of the drain with Epoxy.com Product #660 – http://epoxy.com/660.aspx  -Aluminum Filled Primer. Product #660 Universal Primer and Finish cures to a tack-free finish in 1-2 hours and can be recoated between 2 and 24 hours @ 75°F with 50% Relative humidity
  7. Mix a small batch of neat (just resin and hardener, not filler) Product #10 – www.epoxy.com/10.aspx. Use this mix to prime all areas that the patch (Step 8) will need to bond to. Apply this to all concrete surfaces as well as to the surfaces primed with  #660 Aluminum Filled Primer (Step 6).  You can either let the material in Step 7 set overnight and continue with the this step within 24 hours of priming,or you can move to the next step immediately. The purpose of this primer is to make sure there is a secure bond between the patch which will be a dry mix of epoxy and aggregate and the other surfaces that would otherwise be dry. This reinforces the bond line between the patch (in Step 8) and all surfaces it will need to bond to.
  8. Make a mortar of properly mixed Epoxy.com Product #10 and Epoxy.com Mortar Aggregate Product #82. Trowel the mix in to level the space between the drain and the remaining tile. Be sure to trowel the surface smooth. Allow to cure overnight.
  9. Do a squeegee coat of the properly mixed neat (no aggregate) Product #10 to seal the patch installed in Step 8.
  10. Allow to cure until it is hard to the touch, typically 10-12 hours at 75 degrees F.
  11. Within 24 hours apply a coat of Epoxy.com Product #2 – Chemical Resistant Epoxy Coating – www.epoxy.com/2.aspx.  Add optional but recommended Epoxy.com Anti-skid – https://www.epoxy.com/non-skid-additive-polycarbonate-aggregate.aspx  – to the #2 before applying it. Allow to cure hard to the touch.
  12. Repeat step 11.

For additional question be sure to contact Epoxy.com Technical Support at 352-533- 2167 or email us at info@epoxy.com

Be sure the Epoxy.com Lable is on your product.


Patching Vinyl Ester Floors With Novolac

July 28, 2016

A customer writes:

“We have a dairy processing and packaging facility that was built circa 1994.  At the time of construction we chose to install a flooring system which was vinyl ester based with fiberglass mat.  The floor has held up quite well in areas where it had a good bond.  The failures we have seen are in areas that covered either an expansion joint or control joint in the concrete.  In these areas the flooring has delaminated from the concrete.  Where possible we have made a clean cut through the flooring to an area where we had a good bond and left the concrete exposed.  Other failure areas are around floor drains.  We have made repairs with quick curing epoxies in the past but these don’t seem to bond well to the existing vinyl ester flooring. 

“Having a manufacturing facility with only one down day limits our ability to make substantive repairs.  During a search for low or no VOC  flooring systems I you folks.”

I have personally made many thousands of square feet of floor repairs that sounds exactly like the issues and conditions that you are describing.

Here is what I did to permanently resolve the issue, at least in the patched areas.

  1. Cut back the edges of the delaminated areas back to a point where the vinyl ester is well attached.
  2. Prep the concrete under the failed area and the edges of the old material – epoxy.com/surfaceprep.aspx.
  3. Prime with Epoxy.com Product #12 – epoxy.com/12.aspx
  4. Install a trowel coat of Epoxy.com Product #630 – epoxy.com/633.aspx and
    1. Epoxy Mortar Blend aggregate #82 Mortar Blend Aggregate
    2. Allow to cure hard to the touch and cool.
  5. Glaze with a neat coat of Epoxy.com Product #633 with optional Anti-skid – http://epoxy.com/non-skid-additive-polycarbonate-aggregate.aspx

Please email your additional questions to norm@epoxy.com or visit http://www.epoxy.com .


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