Are Epoxy.com 100% Solids Epoxy Low VOC

June 23, 2016

A user writes: “I have seen a number of your products that are on a list or marked with a tag that says Zero (0) VOCs.  When I look at the data sheet it says that the Epoxy.com product is 100% Solids, but does not say it is Zero (0) VOCs.”

Norm Lambert > Thank you for pointing that out.  You bring up an excellent question.  Epoxy.com Products that are 100% solids (100% active ingredients) do not contain solvent, that means they have no VOCs making them compliant with the toughest Low VOC Standards. I will start updating pages on the Epoxy.com to reflect that in the future.  Until then please rest assured that all Epoxy.com Products that are 100% solids have no VOCs in them.


Epoxy Oil Stop Primer

May 13, 2016
Epoxy_oil_stop_primer

Oil Saturated Concrete

 

Oily contaminated concrete is very difficult to bond to, but it can be done with special care and Epoxy.com Product #201 Oil Stop Primer.  Plant floors, warehouse floors, commercial, and residential garage floors can all have this problem.  Here is a typical question that I get about oil contaminated floors:

“We were looking at your product because we have a floor in a maintenance garage that is pretty well soaked with oil.  A new tenant is going into that space so we know that there needs to be something to allow the new floor to stick and to stop the odors.”

Here is my typical response:

Is the oil saturation petroleum oil? If so you need to:

  1. Degrease the floor
  2. Mechanically clean the floor – www.epoxy.com/surfaceprep.aspx.
  3. Apply 1 coat of Epoxy.com Product #201 – www.epoxy.com/201.aspx – at a rate of 200-320 SF per gallon.
  4. Inspect for bond the next day. If bond fails remove the loose #201 and go back to step one.
  5. If bond is good check for oil on top of the primer.  If there is oil on top of the #201 and it is well bonded remove the oil with xylene or other effective degreaser.
  6. Coat with 2 coats of Epoxy.com Product #2 – www.epoxy.com/2.aspx.

I like the Product #2 for these applications because it is very resistant to petroleum oils. Depending on your specific application the material you use over the #201 can be a number of different flooring, coating systems or chemical resistant epoxy floor systems.

For more information, please visit our website at www.Epoxy.com, contact our technical support department at 352-533-2167 or email me at norm@epoxy.com for a specific recommendation.

 


Epoxy Cold Temperature

January 27, 2016

 

Installing Epoxy in Coolers and Cold Temperature

Extend Epoxy Installation Season into Winter

 

I have spoken on this subject here before but this time of year I get a lot of calls and emails about installing epoxy in cold temperatures. Our company started out as an installation company in Vermont. Summers are very short and winters are very long in Vermont. To stay a viable company, we had to figure ways of working through the winter.

Tenting and heating areas during the winter is time consuming and expensive. The solution is found in resin products that will set in low temperatures. The most durable and cost effective options of installation at cold temperatures is Epoxy and Methyl Methacrylate.

Cold Temperature Cure Resins can also be used as a super-fast setting Resinous Mortar or Coating at normal temperatures. Our Cold Temperature Cure Resins used at normal temperature give you quick turnaround time for small jobs, or larger jobs that require a short turn-around time.

Cold Temperatures Epoxies

Cold Temperature Cure Epoxy Resins allow installation to be done at low temperatures as low as 35°F., (although it sets a lot faster at 40°F) expanding your epoxy coating and epoxy flooring installation season. Epoxy.com Cold Temperature Cure Epoxy Resins can also be used in cold storage areas like food processing areas, where the temperature cannot be raised higher than 35° F or so. Normal cured epoxy typically requires 50°F or more.

Depending on how you mix the aggregate into the products below, they can be used as a mortar for overlays, or a grout for sealing between other hardened construction materials.

Commonly Used Cold Temperature epoxies

Product #1 Cold Temperature Cure Epoxy Coating is 100% solids and specially formulated coatings for cold temperature applications. Cold Temperature Epoxy Coating #1 is able to cure at temperatures as low as 35°F. It is has Zero (0) VOCs. Since it has no VOCs, it has no solvent so it meets the strictest possible standard for a low VOC coating. It is often used in coolers and food preparation areas that require constant low temperatures. Product #1 Cold Temperature Cure Epoxy Coating is also frequently used in room temperature applications to meet super-fast cure, limited shutdown needs.

Product #10 Cold Temperature Curing Epoxy Mortar Resin – This product has a low modulus of elasticity (flexibility) and is Low Viscosity. The low viscosity allows heavy loading of the right fillers. The heavy filler loading helps not only to save money, but helps to maintain better thermal coefficient with respect to concrete and steel. The low modulus of elasticity prevents it from being brittle making it less vulnerable to thermal coefficient differences. It also gives it better impact resistance.

You can find more information on cold temperature cured epoxy at: http://www.epoxy.com/EpoxyColdCured.aspx.

Please send me your questions to me by email to norm@epoxy.com

 

 


Acid Etching Revisited

January 25, 2016

During my last blog on January 10, 2016 about “Surface Preparation When Installing Concrete” we discussed among other things preparation of concrete by acid etching. I want to revisit that now in a slightly less formal explanation about why it is not the best of the possible methods of doing surface preparation.

Acid etching does not remove most contamination from the concrete. It is necessary before you acid etch concrete to remove most typical type of contamination like oil, grease, paint, mastic, and a host of other things first.

Acid etching attacks the Portland Cement. The Portland cement is the “glue” that is holding your concrete together. So acid etching done incorrectly will do more damage than good. Even if you do it correctly your floor may not be as strong a substrate for epoxy (or anything else) than it would have been if you mechanically cleaned it.

If you are going to acid etch I suggest that you not only do it properly but follow it with abrasive cleaning, to remove the soft top part of your concrete that is damaged by the acid etching. When I was an installer of epoxy products I rarely if ever acid etched but instead did mechanical cleaning.

Here are some of the reasons acid etching may not be desirable for your job.

  1. Acid etching is a risk to safety. Acid can damage items at your jobsite and pose a risk of injury to the people in the area.
  2. Mechanical cleaning is better for the environment, no acid will find its way into the ecosystem.
  3. Mechanical cleaning allows quicker turnaround time, you don’t have to wait overnight for the substrate to dry.
  4. Mechanical cleaning gives you more consistently high quality substrate than acid etching does.

In summary, whenever you can use abrasive cleaning it is safer and better than acid etching.

Please email me your questions to norm@epoxy.com or visit our website at www.epoxy.com


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