Chemical Resistant Epoxy Selection

October 20, 2016

Requirements for a Chemical Resistant Epoxy or Vinyl Ester


Our Epoxy and Vinyl Ester product lines has extensive uses in Chemical Containment
and Chemical Resistance projects. The kind of product and systems we recommend are
based on a number of factors.  First we need to know exactly what you are doing:

  1. Are you patching concrete that has been damaged already? If so what is the extent
    of the damage?
  2. Do you need a secondary containment coating? If so what kind of traffic (if any)
    will this area see? Many of our systems will handle very heavy traffic.
  3. Are there any cracks that need repairing? If so how many lineal feet of cracks
    are there, what is the average depth and what is the average width. Repairing the cracks
    is the first step in making your project water and chemical tight.
  4. Are you looking to grout tile? We have chemically resistant Epoxy Tile Grout that
    has excellent chemical resistance.
  5. Is there any petroleum oil saturated concrete in the area. If so we have a product
    for that too.
  6. Is there any moisture vapor that is being transmitted through the floor?  We
    have solutions for that so please bring that to our attention when you contact us.
  7. Is this in an area where Static Disruptive or Conductive materials are needed (typically
    only in an explosive environment or where delicate electronics must be protected
    from static discharge).
  8. Total square footage of area requiring Chemical
    Resistant Epoxy or Vinyl Ester.

Then we will need to know some specifics about the chemical you are trying to protect
against:

  1. What is the specific chemical (or chemicals) that you are trying to resist against?
  2. What is the specific concentration of the chemical (or chemicals)?
  3. What is the duration of the exposure, before it will be cleaned up (if ever)?
  4. Is the exposure at an elevated temperature? If so what is that temperature, and
    how long will the chemicals be at this elevated temperature

If you have this information when you contact us, we can quickly help you to decide
what chemical resistant system is best and most economical for you.

Here is some additional reading that might interest you.

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For more information contact Epoxy.com Technical Support at info@epoxy.com or by calling us at 352-533-2167.


Machine Shop Floors

October 14, 2016

A customer writes, “I have a machine shop floor. The concrete has had a lot of oil on it over the years.  I need an anti-skid floor that will be easy to clean and will hold up to cutting oils and anti-freeze and protect the environment.

We have done exactly what you are asking many times.  A mechanics shop floor typically is done the same way.  Here is how:

1.       Good surface prep – www.epoxy.com/surfaceprep.aspx

2.       Properly mix and apply 1 coat of Epoxy.com Product #201 – www.epoxy.com/201.aspx oil stop primer to all oil saturated or potentially oil saturated areas at a rate of 200-300 SF per gallon.  Allow this to harden and inspect for good bond (see “Checking the Bond” below.  If any areas are loose return to step 1. If everything is well bonded proceed to next step within 24 hours of  this step.

3.       Properly mix and apply 1 coat of Epoxy.com Product #899 – www.epoxy.com/899.aspx – applied at a rate of 250-300 SF per gallon.  Allow to cure hard and proceed to next step within 24 hours of this step.

4.       Properly mix (including optional but recommended anti-skid 4a below) and apply first coat of Epoxy.com Product #2  – www.epoxy.com/2.aspx  – at a rate of 160-200 SF per gallon per coat by brush or roller. Allow to cure hard and proceed to next step within 24 hours of this step.

a.       Mix optional but recommended Epoxy.com Anti-Skid – http://www.epoxy.com/non-skid-additive-polycarbonate-aggregate.aspx – to the #2 at a rate of 12-16 ounces per gallon of mixed epoxy.  Mix completely into the mixed A&B #2 before applying the #2

5.       Properly mix (including optional but recommended Anti-Skid – http://www.epoxy.com/non-skid-additive-polycarbonate-aggregate.aspx 5a below) and apply 2nd coat of Epoxy.com Product #2  – www.epoxy.com/2.aspx  – at a rate of 160-200 SF per gallon per coat by brush or roller. Allow to cure hard for 24 hours at 70 degrees F. for light traffic, 48 hours for light traffic.

a.       Mix optional but recommended Epoxy.com Anti-Skid to the #2 at a rate of 12-16 ounces per gallon of mixed epoxy.  Mix completely into the mixed A&B #2 before applying the #2

Checking The Bond

There are a number of ways to check the bond of a floor.  A simple way with Epoxy Flooring is to try to separate the epoxy from the concrete. That can be done with the corner of a putty knife or a screw driver.  If you can remove the coating cleanly from the concrete without pulling concrete it is likely that you have a bond problem.  If you cannot get it off or you must dig off concrete to get it off, you most likely have a good bond.


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