Maintaining Epoxy Stone

May 17, 2016
Epoxy_Stone_Overlays

Product #17 Epoxy Stone Overlay, with mixed stone sizes

It is that time of year again. If you have Epoxy Stone Overlays you know it gives  beautiful natural look. The Epoxy Stone Overlay looks like wet shinny rock. It allows water to flow more naturally, giving you additional drainage in areas that you are walking where you feet might get wet if it is raining or near a water source like a pool.

As time goes by your stone will get less shinny.  This is not just an esthetic issue.  The

Epoxy stone overlays need to be reglazed from time to time. That is true about epoxy stone overlay systems available from us or from anyone else. In some parts of the country in the direct sunlight this could be every year. Other parts of the country with less sun might be 5 or more years. If you wait to long to reseal your stone it will start failing as the bond breaks down between the individual stones. The stones will then start becoming loose. If not resealed soon enough eventially the whole system will fail. Sealing at proper intervals with the right material is the only way to prevent this.

If you don’t want a system you need to maintain, we have other (non rock) systems that require little or no maintanance.

Resealing the Epoxy Stone Overlay.

Product #15 Chemical Resistant Epoxy Floor Resurfacing System is typically used for resealing epoxy bonded stone. Product #15 Chemical Resistant Resurfacing system oxidizes much slower than other epoxies, and usually last much longer than other epoxies used for reglazing epoxied stone pebbles. You don’t want to use other epoxies that oxidize excessively unless you are willing to reglaze 1.5 to 2 times more often than with Product #15.

The Product #15 Epoxy to reseal your stone not only adds shine back but actually reinforces the connections between the stone. Never use acrylic and other sealers commonly sold at big box stores to reseal your stone. These non-epoxy sealers add shine back to the stone, but doesn’t do anything to reinforce the bond between the individual stones. Worse yet unless the single component non-epoxy sealers have totally been warn away, they will act as a bond breaker preventing future epoxy resealing from getting to the surfaces they need to get to, in order to give you your original strenth back.


Epoxy Oil Stop Primer

May 13, 2016
Epoxy_oil_stop_primer

Oil Saturated Concrete

 

Oily contaminated concrete is very difficult to bond to, but it can be done with special care and Epoxy.com Product #201 Oil Stop Primer.  Plant floors, warehouse floors, commercial, and residential garage floors can all have this problem.  Here is a typical question that I get about oil contaminated floors:

“We were looking at your product because we have a floor in a maintenance garage that is pretty well soaked with oil.  A new tenant is going into that space so we know that there needs to be something to allow the new floor to stick and to stop the odors.”

Here is my typical response:

Is the oil saturation petroleum oil? If so you need to:

  1. Degrease the floor
  2. Mechanically clean the floor – www.epoxy.com/surfaceprep.aspx.
  3. Apply 1 coat of Epoxy.com Product #201 – www.epoxy.com/201.aspx – at a rate of 200-320 SF per gallon.
  4. Inspect for bond the next day. If bond fails remove the loose #201 and go back to step one.
  5. If bond is good check for oil on top of the primer.  If there is oil on top of the #201 and it is well bonded remove the oil with xylene or other effective degreaser.
  6. Coat with 2 coats of Epoxy.com Product #2 – www.epoxy.com/2.aspx.

I like the Product #2 for these applications because it is very resistant to petroleum oils. Depending on your specific application the material you use over the #201 can be a number of different flooring, coating systems or chemical resistant epoxy floor systems.

For more information, please visit our website at www.Epoxy.com, contact our technical support department at 352-533-2167 or email me at norm@epoxy.com for a specific recommendation.

 


Choosing Stone for Epoxy Stone

May 5, 2016

Epoxy_Stone_OverlaysBonding stone together with Product #17 – Epoxy Stone Adhesive is attractive and functional. It allows you to have the look of natural rock. This “natural rock” will let water pass through it just like its non-epoxied counterparts. It is however a good choice when you don’t want that stone to be moved, accidentally or on purpose.

This function is so nice that I am seeing projects where larger and larger stone is being utilized for the same reasons (above) as the small stone. There are a few shortcomings that should be avoided when bonding larger stones.

You want to make sure when selecting your stone that it is not too round. Round stone reduces the square inches of surfaces touching each other that are bonded together. That reduces the strength of the material, by reducing the square inches of bonding surface. If angular stone is used (as in the picture above) you increase the surface area touching each other and increase the strength.

If you want larger stones in the mix, I suggest you use a variety of smaller stone to fill in the large gaps between the bigger stone. If you combine a mixed gradation of stone that is also angular (not round) you can get an excellent compromise of strength and large stone beauty.


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